Spreading joy in the workplace: latest from the 15 seconds 30 minutes project

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In their second blog, our Sir Peter Carr Award winners, Daniel Wadsworth and Dr. Rachel Pilling from Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust share the latest developments in their project to show all staff how they can be a hero at work.

A lot has happened since our first blog about the 15 seconds 30 minutes (15s30m) project. Here are a few of the headlines.

And the winner is...

Having shortlisted our favourite straplines for the project, the team has voted for ‘You can make today better’, and so onward with the task of ordering our branded goodies. To help spread the word about the 15s30m project and reward people for suggesting ideas, we’ll have pens and Post-its, and those lucky heroes attending a workshop will get a lanyard – photos next time.

Going live

Our trust’s internal 15s30m webpage went live at the end of October, and hosts our '100 days 100 ideas' list. An external webpage is planned for early next year and we look forward to sharing the link in due course. Keep your ideas coming: email 15s.30m@bthft.nhs.uk 

Planning ahead

We've been spending time this month planning how best to use the resources that come with the Sir Peter Carr Award to aid our personal development. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s conference in Amsterdam in May will be a great arena in which to share our 15s30m project as well as immerse ourselves in all things improvement. It’s something we simply couldn’t have done without the award funding, and we’re really excited about planning our presentation. 

We have also generously been offered places on NHS Improvement’s Quality Service Improvement and Redesign (QSIR) programme in January. This will give us the opportunity not only to hone our QI knowledge and skill but spend time with fellow Sir Peter Carr Award finalists and share our learning with them.

Spreading our wings

We are keen to use the 15s30m principles further afield than the acute trust. We have begun discussions with the clinical commissioning group and local GPs to bring together ideas they could use to reduce frustration and improve patient experience when passing between primary and secondary care. We were really excited to receive emails from the King’s Fund and Healthwatch, who had read our blog. We’re planning work with them later this year as part of our national outreach.

And we're off...

Our first mini workshop was held on 1 November as a short section within a Quality Improvement meeting about deteriorating patients. The teams have given us brilliant ideas to work through with them and plenty of material to springboard other groups into action. It led to some surprising suggestions too. One staff member took the approach that increasing joy at work began at home – walking her dogs before she came to work would put both her and the dogs in a better mood, as well as reduce the time she spent picking up mess from the garden when she got home. Here are some pics from the first event …

Rachel explains the concept of 15s30m.

The 15s30m cog effect.

My 15s30m idea is...

And here's a bit of homework for you all ...

We thought we’d share one of the examples we work through in our workshops: see where it takes you. We draw out how far-reaching a single 15-second act can be by allowing ourselves to celebrate the potential follow-on consequences in our day and for those we come into contact with. We begin with the 15-second action of checking the weather before going to bed and putting paper on your windscreen if it's going to be frosty. 

Following this action through the day and thinking about all the subsequent positive outcomes and time saving is very interesting – let us know how this 15s30m project could change your life.

Please email any queries or your 15s30m ideas to 15s.30m@bthft.nhs.uk

Have you found us on twitter yet (@15s30m @BTHFT)?

Dan and Rachel

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